Calling out the village people: Yes YOU!

margaretmead101283 (2)This week thanks to our governments eternal love for holidays… for being such a poor country boy we sure do have a bunch of holidays but this post is not about that it’s about you…. As I was saying because of the holidays I got to come home to Roatan for this week, it has been great to spend time with my mom and sisters, meet with some people who have been helping me in my journey and see old friends. I LOVE my country and I love my island, Roatan is a very unique place filled with many wonderful people. People from all over the world come here to call this place home, or to get a view of the beauty that is found here.

Today I am calling some of those people out and I´m putting you on the spot.
I have seen some of the reporting concerning the local hospital but I refrained from commenting till I came home and could get a close up look. My friends what is going on with the hospital is a damn shame but it’s our fault. We have made great investment on this island our infrastructure is getting there we have some beautiful resorts we have some awesome restaurants yes our roads are awful and our hospital is …. Well I don’t need to tell you, but we have not invested in our human resource, education is a huge problem for us. Now I am not saying that we do not have highly educated people here because we do, but we need more. I was telling a friend, don’t you think this situation would be a lot different if the minister of health was someone from the island or if we had somebody in the minister´s office? Dr Raymond is an awesome doctor but he was left to hold the forth alone, but he couldn´t he needs reinforcement. we need Highly qualified people with a passion for our community and only then things will change.

Here is the good news, the cavalry is coming! But your help is needed!


Consider this a shameless plug because well…. that´s what it is. See, for the past three years I have had a village of friends who have helped me on my journey to become a doctor with a message and a mission here in Honduras. Thanks to them next year I will be taking my last semester classes then I will start my rotations, But to do that I need your help I need you to dream with me.

I am running a fundraiser to raise 8000 dollars to cover a full year of medical school, without raising the money I would not be able to fulfil my calling. I have tried to tell some, it is great for us to have missionary trips and medical brigades and I sure appreciate the people who are willing to take the time and money to do that they fill such an important role that someday I hope to become one of them, it’s largely because of their influence in my life that I have a much different view on life than other guys who grow up in extreme poverty the way I did, but the best we can do is to help train people in the community our effect would be much greater and the ripple effect in doing so is really immeasurable.

I would like to one of those local strategic investments you can make today, I am asking you to help me on this journey. Please go on over to and click the donate button today.  I cannot do this without your help. Please also consider sharing my story with your friends via Facebook. I greatly appreciate any action taken to help me. I know trying to raise 8000 dollars is hard but I must try, I am trusting God and YOU to help me get there.

I proudly continue working hard to be a community doctor. I continue to dream of helping and healing people and with your help. Please go on over to SOL today and chip in to help get me accross the finish line.Make sure to type Natan Webster in the dedication line, and please make sure to share this post with your friends. Also remember that all donations made via SOL are tax deductible.

I need 150 people to donate 48 dollars to reach my goal, friend I am calling on you to consider investing in me today, and to sharing my journey with your friends. If I could get a loan I would, I don’t mind graduating with some debt I just want to graduate, I just want an opportunity to be all that I can be, I want an opportunity to prove myself and to be the change I want to see in the world.

donate here now help me get over the finish line.

I am thankful to my mentors, friends, and supporters who continue to share my story with others.

Please feel free to contact me with any questions.

Will you be a part of this?


Dear Friends and Family,
I write this post with excitement, great Joy and hope for the future, as I continue my journey into medical school. As most of you know with help from Miss Peggy Stranges and Sol foundation I applied to and passed the admission testing, making more than the minimum requirement to enter medical school in Honduras in the summer of 2011.

My road to medical school has been challenging at best, as few students in my situation have tried to gain access to medical programs and succeeded, and of those who succeed to get in even fever actually get thru the program. I was born in less than ideal circumstances and have had and uphill battle all the way constantly beating long odds to overcome the challenges of life. I am the oldest of four siblings, and while growing up very poor with a single mother who did and awesome job considering the circumstances, I truly am a product of my family and communities hard work and perseverance, there are so many people that have invested time and energy in my journey way long before they even knew I was headed to medical school, Like Ptolemy and Neysa Matthews, and Joelle Fehlauer who came down to Honduras to volunteer time in a christian school I attended,all of whom made and incredible impression on me at a time when I was really struggling, fighting battles they knew nothing about.

I worked for three years at the local hospital in roatan, it was here that I truly became  inspired me to dream big and go beyond the expectations of my neighborhood. I know that inequities exist, and my curiosity for healing and justice deppened. I have made it my personal mission to improve conditions that prevent others from having equal treatment and access to education and healthcare resources. I have made it my mission to ease human suffering I believe this is the reason I was born.

My friends and mentors have said that I am a trailblazer, that I have taken the road less traveled, and that in the face of insurmountable challenges , I have overcome the greatest of obstacles. The reality is that I have had much help to be where I am today, and at every step of the way, I have encountered and relied on the kindness of friends, neighbors, teachers, and mentors to teach me and guide me through the process.

Now once more I must rely on the kindness of others to help me through my next step in medical school. Because Honduras really does not offer formal financial aid programs, or student loans, especially for poor people in medical school who´s parent has no valuable assets . I must fundraise to cover my medical school expenses in order to see my dream of becoming a community doctor come true. While I worked to pay my own way through high school, I am unable to work as a medical student due to the high volume of classes and information I will be required to learn over the next few years. I receive a partial scholarship from the foundation for the advancement of people administered by SOL foundation. which comes under review each year. This agreements as most of you probably already know requires that I raise part of the funds I need from the community.

It takes about 7000 dollars per year for me to stay in the program. I have a formula thru which Sol and Rotary provide roughtly 75% of this which leaves me to raise 1750 dollars per year. I have done this the past two years online with help from many friends. Well it is October I am about done with this year and it is time to do it again friends. I will be meeting with rotary and Sol in December to determine plans for the next year and whether they will continue funding me or not. But how about we start to raise our share and exceed it by them. I got help raising funds for this year from so many of you. Tricia, Anna, Nicki, Jennifer,Mark, Roatan homes, Peggy, Dave  and so many others shared my story and helped me raise the funds I needed for this year in about two weeks.

Friends, today I humbly ask you to dream with me. I am asking you to once again support my goal of becoming a physician by helping sponsor another year of my medical education, It would be impossible for me to do this without your help. My goal is to fundraise at least the 1750 dollars in order to help meet the 7000 dollars I will need for the next school year. . I am doing what I can in applying to scholarships, finding alternative measures of funding, and now asking for your support.

I know there are many other needs and I have seem so many request for money lately on Facebook for so many good causes, I also know that while we would like to help everyone there is only so much we can do. I have lamented how politicians are able to raise so much money from so many donors while many charities are lacking funding. But the truth is  one of the reasons they are able to do so is because a lot of people know about them.

Friend one of the best things you can do besides chipping in yourself is making sure to share this with your friends. I know there are many people who would be glad to help if they only knew about my dream and my story. After all, all I need is 1750 people to donate 1 dollar.

As I have mentioned before I am only able to continue on this journey because of the generous support of people like you, I would really appreciate it if you would go over to sol foundation website and make a donation of any amount to help me thru next year and to help me complete this program. I assure you I will honor that donation in loving service, and by making sure I am doing everything I can to pay it forward. Just make sure to type Natan Webster in the dedication box. Every penny sent to sol with the dedication line Natan Webster is administered to my scholarship Program, and is a foundational stone in helping me become a doctor with a message and a mission in Honduras.

Cesar words resonate with my life goals of community work — “We cannot seek achievement for ourselves and forget about progress and prosperity for our community… Our ambitions must be broad enough to include the aspirations and needs of others, for their sakes and for our own.” I believe in the power we have as a community and hope that you can help me reach my dream of becoming a physician.
Thanks to the support of many I am about to finish and will soon be posting grades for macro-anatomy, neuro-anatomy,embryology,histology, and public health.

With your help next year, I’ll be able to finish physiology, bioquem, psychology, public health,microbiology, and genetics 

I proudly continue working hard to be a community doctor. I continue to dream of helping and healing people and with your help, I will be one step closer to creating a healthier, and more just world for all of us.
Please go on over to SOL today and chip in making sure to type Natan Webster in the dedication line, and please make sure to share this post with your friends. Also remember that all donations made via SOL are tax deductible.

donate here now

Please feel free to contact me with any questions.

Thank you!

Wow It´s not just me!!!


I must admit I have been feeling the blues lately. It seems like all heaven and hell have come together to take me down this semester. I take one step forward and I´m pushed two step backward. Nothing has been working out the way it should, both in and outside of the classroom and it is very stressful and frustating. Then I found this article online and it really helped me. now I don´t think I need to see a doctor just yet but it sure helps to know that its not just me.

Anonymous asked you: hi, it’s me again. maybe i don’t have depression. maybe i’m just.. deficient in coping with things. i’m not happy with how i’m handling problems- i’m a pro at running away and freaking out later. is a simple thing such as random tears, negative thoughts and inability to handle daily stresses a warning sign big enough for a visit to the doc? i keep thinking and worrying about flunking, about dropping medschool….

Dear anonymous (and to anyone else experiencing a similar situation),

The short answer is yes, you are completely justified in seeking help. I need both hands and both feet to count the number of times I’ve seen doctors and counsellors and psychologists because I wanted to drop out of med school, because I felt like I wasn’t coping, and damn it, everyone around me was doing so well. 

Let’s be honest—med school is hard. I remember sitting in a lecture in second year, watching all the other students around me, and they were in perfect control of med school. They sat through lectures without falling asleep and without panicking about exams in two months and without being afraid of being judged, they took notes studiously and went home to their friends and family and lovers and siblings and maintained healthy relationships and seemingly flawless grades. It felt like I was the only one in a hall of hundreds of students that didn’t know how to make it through med school.

I spent an entire semester avoiding lectures and other students and hiding in the library because I thought I was crazy.

There’s something no one ever tells us about med school, and it’s this: we’re all struggling. I was having coffee with a colleague the other day, and he started to explain to me his struggles with depression, his excessive alcohol intake at the start of med school—and this is someone I’d always looked up to. Someone who, in my opinion, checked all the boxes: intelligent, kind, funny, surrounded by family and friends. And yet, he was someone struggling through med school as well. Very few med students wear their hearts on their sleeves—that’s why I keep this blog somewhat anonymous, because I’m still learning to let myself be vulnerable.

I suppose what I’m trying to say is that you’re not alone, and med school has the ability to make us our own worst enemies. But, at the same time, it doesn’t have to be the end of you. You don’t have to try and cope with these thoughts and feelings and fears alone. You, and every other medical student, every other health care student, every other person in general, are entitled to help and to have what’s going on validated. I can’t diagnose you with depression over the internet (or without a qualification of some sort), but whether you meet the criteria or not is irrelevant. You are allowed to seek help. You are allowed to talk to a professional and you are allowed to let them help you.

Please don’t struggle alone. Med school has no right to make you feel this way.

Take care of yourself and I hope you seek some help—talk to your family doctor or to your university health department.

My Life As A Med Student.


“A ship in harbor is safe. But that’s now what ships are built for.” William Shedd

The odds are against me!!!


Having finished this semester( referring to 2014 semester, currently I´m in my second 2015 semester) and now back on the Island for a few weeks, Thank God!!!
I have a little time to relax and unwind, this semester was pretty tough and filled with many unexpected and unplanned events. But certainly one filled with many valuable life lessons.

One thing that I have been thinking about a lot the last few days is something that someone said to me a couple weeks ago. This person looked me in the face and said “You do know that the odds are against you right? The odds of you finishing this program are very low, and frankly I would be very surprise if you do.”
Now before you go all judgmental on this person remember I am not providing much context here, and I believe the person was not trying to be mean or anything, just stating a matter of fact, and get into an interesting conversation.
Also if you just look at me, This person was absolutely right. I am an african latino dude dude, raise by a single mother. I was born and have grown up poor, and I´m the product of the public education system in a Honduras (arguably one of the worse in the civilized world). Yep the odds are definitely against me!!!!
Alas what am I to do?

Well there is a hymn that I love it says ” Count your blessings name them one by one, count your blessings see what God has done, count your many blessings name them one by one and it will surprise you what the Lord has done.”

See the odds have always been against me. I have defied the odds and continue to defy them with my very existence. My mom did not have me till she was 24 years old, that was not by design. My mom had been trying to get pregnant for a long time, she thought she was unable to bear children and sought the Lord and begged him for me. See I was not even suppose to be here in the first place.
When time came for me to be born my mother was taken to the hospital where she was told I was too big and she would have to get and emergency C section immediately, seeing as there was no way she could have a natural birth. My mother was afraid and decided to run away from the hospital, she took a cab home, where my grandmother found her lying in bed with a 9 and a half pound baby . My grandmother then become my mom´s midwife on the spot, full disclosure my grandmother had some experience with these situations before. Yep, I came into this world with the odds against me. I was born in an old beat down house with no medical help and no preparation, my umbilical cord was cut with an unsterilized pair of scissors, and clamped off with clothespins that had been used to hang the laundry, no pots of boiling water, no doctor, no nothing and still here at 26 healthy as a horse and big as a hipo.

When I was a over a year old my mother had left me in the living room playing with a toy and was in the kitchen preparing a meal, she heard a noise as tho I had fallen which caused her to run into the living room, sure enough I was lying on my back, but my mother was alarmed when she saw me frothing at the mouth. She immediately took me to the emergency room, after the doctors did whatever it is that they did. The referred her to a pediatrician which explained to her that I was way too overweight and would need to go on a special diet immediately, They said too much fat was covering my heart, and if it had taken her 5 minutes longer to get to the hospital that day I would have died. Yep the odds were against me, did I mention I´m 26 years old!!!!

When I was old enough to go to kindergarten my mother enrolled me, to her education was very important.She was not able to get very much herself, and she wanted make sure I got as much as I could. I went to kindergarten one day and never went back, because the teacher sent me home that day with a note to my mom. I have never been a troublemaker and while I do not remember that day very well, I do remember hoping I had not gotten in trouble, because I liked kindergarten very much. The next day my mom took me to kindergarten the teacher explained to her I was too smart for kindergarten and for her to keep me there would be a waste of time, I was then matriculated in first grade. Yep I passed kinder garden in a day. The school year starts in february and finishes in november. On a day right after my birthday in august the teacher, this time my first grade teacher, gave me a second note to take home, this time to my grandmother ( she was taking care of me because my mother had to work).My grandmother took me to class the next day where the teacher explained to her that she was moving me to second grade, because I was way too smart for first grade I was just wasting time. Yep I´m the only guy I know who did three grades in a year. My whole family could not be prouder, and I grew up all my life being told how smart I am. You wouldn’t know that from my english spelling and grammar ha?
But alas the odds have always been against me!!! See I was top of my class all the way thru elementary school, but by the time I got to high school my mom had three children ( me and my two sisters) and there was no way she could afford to keep me in school, and as is the case and tradition in all poor families especially single mother homes, my mom needed me to get a job. She did not want me to help pay the bills as is expected of most boys who are the first borns, she just wanted me to get a job so I could afford to keep going to school. Well she got me a job, I started working during the day and going to school at night. But the odds where still against me, there were times I had to drop out of school because even having a job, I couldn’t afford to keep going. Which resulted in both my sisters graduating high school before me, the genius in the family. By the time I graduated high school I was just glad to get thru it, and had a job in the local public hospital that I loved.
So when the Lord called me into medicine I knew that wasn’t going to happen, one my upbringing, and the odds where against me! ME getting to do something like that was impossible.There was no way I could afford it, there was no way I would leave my job, my family, my church, my girlfriend, move to one of the most dangerous places on earth, there was just no way!!!
When the Lord started opening the doors in the amazing way I have described in a previous post, I and everyone that knows me was just amazed. I am now completely done with first step( seventeen classes at the university), and will be starting at the faculty of medicine next year. Yep with the odds still against me!!

The odds have always been against me folks, from day one, Oh the stories I could tell, I suffered things that an adult should never suffer worse so a child, but I’m still fighting, fighting to survive, fighting to make my mark on this earth, I believe I was born for a purpose and I believe God has keep me here this long, yes even with the odds stacked high against me, to fulfil that purpose. I believe I have been blessed and highly favored.

I worry about the odds sometimes I must admit. I worry that the funding will dry up for this program. I worry that I will not be able to raise enough money to cover the cost for next year. I worry about the high crime rate in the capital and pray I am not a victim before I´m finished. I worry about my heart, it already almost gave out on me once. I worry about my mother, she is getting older and needs me to help her financially rather than her still having to help her 26 year old boy go to a fancy medical program in the capital. I worry about my sisters. I worry about the odds.
But I know that the same God that has brought me so far, and has placed many good people in my life, will lead me till my journey here is done. The best thing that God has given me is my mother she is the strongest woman I know, she taught me to work hard and dream big. She taught me to keep fighting and to never give up no matter how hard it gets. She always tells me I am a blessed person, and I believe her.

Next January I will be starting in the next step of this journey, and I would like to know I have you in my corner, share my blog with someone, make a comment on here, send me a message, anything you can do I greatly appreciate.

As I have mentioned before I am only able to continue on this journey because of the generous support of people like you, I would really appreciate it if you would go over to sol foundation website and make a donation of any amount to help me thru next year and to help me complete this program. I assure you I will honor that donation in loving service, and by making sure I am doing everything I can to pay it forward. Just make sure to type “Natan Webster” in the dedication box. Every penny sent to sol with the dedication line Natan Webster is administered to my scholarship Program, and is a foundational stone in helping me become a doctor with a message and a mission in Honduras.

Every donation made via SOL is tax deductible
If you have any question please feel free to contact me.

Thank you for your support
This Hymn has been on my mind a lot lately, thought I would share it with you.

Life is like a mountain railroad, with an engineer that’s brave;
We must make the run successful, from the cradle to the grave;
Watch the curves, the hills, the tunnels; never falter, never fail;
Keep your hand upon the throttle, and your eye upon the rail.

Blessed Savior, Thou wilt guide us,
Till we reach that blissful shore;
Where the angels wait to join us
In Thy praise forevermore.

You will roll up grades of trial; you will cross the bridge of strife;
See that Christ is your Conductor on this lightning train of life;
Always mindful of obstruction, do your duty, never fail;
Keep your hand upon the throttle, and your eye upon the rail.



Wonder if I’ll agree with these when I’m finished.

Things You Wish You Knew Before Starting Medical School

Simple enough, here are 101 things you wish you knew before starting medical school.

  1. If I had known what it was going to be like, I would never have done it.
  2. You’ll study more than you ever have in your life.
  3. Only half of your class will be in the top 50%. You have a 50% chance of being in the top half of your class. Get used to it now.
  4. You don’t need to know anatomy before school starts. Or pathology. Or physiology.
  5. Third year rotations will suck the life out you.
  6. Several people from your class will have sex with each other. You might be one of the lucky participants.
  7. You may discover early on that medicine isn’t for you.
  8. You don’t have to be AOA or have impeccable board scores to match somewhere – only if you’re matching into radiology.
  9. Your social life may suffer some.
  10. Pelvic exams are teh suck.


  11. Residents will probably ask you to retrieve some type of nourishment for them.
  12. Most of your time on rotations will be wasted. Thrown away. Down the drain.
  13. You’ll work with at least one attending physician who you’ll want to beat the hell out of.
  14. You’ll work with at least three residents who you’ll want to beat the hell out of.
  15. You’ll ask a stranger about the quality of their stools.
  16. You’ll ask post-op patients if they’ve farted within the last 24 hours.
  17. At some point during your stay, a stranger’s bodily fluids will most likely come into contact with your exposed skin.
  18. Somebody in your class will flunk out of medical school.
  19. You’ll work 14 days straight without a single day off. Probably multiple times.
  20. A student in your class will have sex with an attending or resident.
  21. After the first two years are over, your summer breaks will no longer exist. Enjoy them as much as you can.
  22. You’ll be sleep deprived.
  23. There will be times on certain rotations where you won’t be allowed to eat.
  24. You will be pimped.
  25. You’ll wake up one day and ask yourself is this really what you want out of life.
  26. You’ll party a lot during the first two years, but then that pretty much ends at the beginning of your junior year.
  27. You’ll probably change your specialty of choice at least 4 times.
  28. You’ll spend a good deal of your time playing social worker.
  29. Nurses will treat you badly, simply because you are a medical student.
  30. There will be times when you’ll be ignored by your attending or resident.
  31. You will develop a thick skin. If you fail to do this, you’ll cry often.
  32. Public humiliation is very commonplace in medical training.
  33. Surgeons are awful. Take my word for it now.
  34. It’s always the medical student’s fault.
  35. Gunner is a derogatory word. It’s almost as bad as racial slurs.
  36. You’ll look forward to the weekend, not so you can relax and have a good time but so you can catch up on studying for the week.
  37. Your house might go uncleaned for two weeks during an intensive exam block.
  38. As a medical student on rotations, you don’t matter. In fact, you get in the way and impede productivity.
  39. There’s a fair chance that you will be physically struck by a nurse, resident, or attending physician. This may include slapped on the hand or kicked on the shin in order to instruct you to “move” or “get out of the way.”
  40. Any really bad procedures will be done by you. The residents don’t want to do them, and you’re the low man on the totem pole. This includes rectal examinations and digital disimpactions.
  41. You’ll be competing against the best of the best, the cream of the crop. This isn’t college where half of your classmates are idiots. Everybody in medical school is smart.
  42. Don’t think that you own the world because you just got accepted into medical school. That kind of attitude will humble you faster than anything else.
  43. If you’re in it for the money, there are much better, more efficient ways to make a living. Medicine is not one of them.
  44. Anatomy sucks. All of the bone names sound the same.
  45. If there is anything at all that you’d rather do in life, do not go into medicine.
  46. The competition doesn’t end after getting accepted to medical school. You’ll have to compete for class rank, awards, and residency. If you want to do a fellowship, you’ll have to compete for that too.
  47. You’ll never look at weekends the same again.
  48. Your fourth step in medical school will be like a vacation compared to the first three steps. It’s a good thing too, because you’ll need one.
  49. Somebody in your class will be known as the “highlighter whore.” Most often a female, she’ll carry around a backpack full of every highlighter color known to man. She’ll actually use them, too.
  50. Rumors surrounding members of your class will spread faster than they did in high school.
  51. You’ll meet a lot of cool people, many new friends, and maybe your husband or wife.
  52. No matter how bad your medical school experience was at times, you’ll still be able to think about the good times. Kind of like how I am doing right now.
  53. Your first class get-together will be the most memorable. Cherish those times.
  54. Long after medical school is over, you’ll still keep in contact with the friends you made. I do nearly every day.
  55. Gunners always sit in the front row. This rule never fails. However, not everyone who sits in the front row is a gunner.
  56. There will be one person in your class who’s the coolest, most laid back person you’ve ever met. This guy will sit in the back row and throw paper airplanes during class, and then blow up with 260+ Step I’s after second year. True story.
  57. At the beginning of first year, everyone will talk about how cool it’s going to be to help patients. At the end of third year, everybody will talk about how cool it’s going to be to make a lot of money.
  58. Students who start medical school wanting to do primary care end up in dermatology. Those students who start medical school wanting to do dermatology end up in family medicine.
  59. Telling local girls at parties that you’re a medical student  means nothing. They’ve been hearing that for years. Be more unique.
  60. The money isn’t really that good in medicine. Not if you look at it in terms of hours worked.
  61. Don’t wear your white coat into the gas station, or any other business that has nothing to do with you wearing a white coat. You look like an idiot, and people do make fun of you.
  62. Don’t round on patients that aren’t yours. If you round on another student’s patients, that will spread around your class like fire after a 10 year drought. Your team will think you’re an idiot too.
  63. If you are on a rotation with other students, don’t bring in journal articles to share with the team “on the fly” without letting the other students know. This makes you look like a gunner, and nobody likes a gunner. Do it once, and you might as well bring in a new topic daily. Rest assured that your fellow students will just to show you up.
  64. If you piss off your intern, he or she can make your life hell.
  65. If your intern pisses you off, you can make his or her life hell.
  66. Don’t try to work during medical school. Live life and enjoy the first two years.
  67. Not participating in tons of ECs doesn’t hurt your chances for residency. Forget the weekend free clinic and play some Frisbee golf instead.
  68. Don’t rent an apartment. If you can afford to, buy a small home instead. I saved $200 per month and had roughly $30,000 in equity by choosing to buy versus rent.
  69. Your family members will ask you for medical advice, even after your first week of first year.
  70. Many of your friends will go onto great jobs and fantastic lifestyles. You’ll be faced with 4 more years of debt and then at least 3 years of residency before you’ll see any real earning potential.
  71. Pick a specialty based around what you like to do.
  72. At least once during your 8 year stay, you’ll wonder if you should quit.
  73. It’s amazing how fast time flies on your days off. It’s equally amazing at how slow the days are on a rotation you hate.
  74. You’ll learn to be scared of asking for time off.
  75. No matter what specialty you want to do, somebody on an unrelated rotation will hold it against you.
  76. A great way to piss of attendings and residents are to tell them that you don’t plan to complete a residency.
  77. Sitting around in a group and talking about ethical issues involving patients is not fun.
  78. If an attending or resident treats you badly, call them out on it. You can get away with far more than you think.
  79. Going to class is generally a waste of time. Make your own schedule and enjoy the added free time.
  80. Find new ways to study. The methods you used in college may or may not work. If something doesn’t work, adapt.
  81. Hospitals smell bad.
  82. Subjective evaluations are just that – subjective. They aren’t your end all, be all so don’t dwell on a poor evaluation. The person giving it was probably an idiot, anyway.
  83. Some physicians will tell you it’s better than it really is. Take what you hear (both positive and negative) with a grain of salt.
  84. 90% of surgeons are awful, and 63% of statistics are made up. The former falls in the lucky 37%.
  85. The best time of your entire medical school career is between the times when you first get your acceptance letter and when you start school.
  86. During the summer before medical school starts, do not attempt to study or read anything remotely related to medicine. Take this time to travel and do things for you.
  87. The residents and faculty in OB/GYN will be some of the most malignant personalities you’ve ever come into contact with.
  88. Vaginal deliveries are messy. So are c-sections. It’s just an all-around blood fest if you like that sort of thing.
  89. Despite what the faculty tell you, you don’t need all of the fancy equipment that they suggest for you to buy. All you need is a stethoscope. The other equipment they say you “need” is standard in all clinic and hospital exam rooms. If it’s not standard, your training hospital and clinics suck.
  90. If your school has a note taking service, it’s a good idea to pony up the cash for it. It saves time and gives you the option of not attending lecture.
  91. Medicine is better than being a janitor, but there were times when I envied the people cleaning the hospital trash cans.
  92. Avoid surgery like the plague.
  93. See above and then apply it to OB/GYN as well.
  94. The money is good in medicine, but it’s not all that great especially considering the amount of time that you’ll have to work.
  95. One time an HIV+ patient ripped out his IV and then “slung” his blood at the staff in the room. Go, go infectious disease.
  96. Read Med School Hell now, throughout medical school, and then after you’re done. Then come back and tell me how right I am.